Japanese Chin

Lifestyle needs

Japanese Chin

The Japanese Chin is one of the Toy breeds – dainty looking but typically full of charm and liveliness.  He is not demanding in terms of exercise and is happy to live in most types of home.  His profuse coat sheds considerably and needs frequent grooming.  Like all Toy breeds young children should not be allowed to pick him up or handle him excessively.  It will not be pleasant for him and he could easily be injured.

Inbreeding coefficient – COI

(should be as low as possible)

The breed average COI is 7%

See A Beginners Guide to COI.

Health and welfare problems due to conformation

(body shape and physical characteristics)
  • Brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (breathing difficulties due to unnatural skull shape and extremely short nose – also causes heat regulation difficulties)
  • Poor dentition due to very small mouth size

BVA/KC Health Schemes  http://www.bva.co.uk/chs

None applicable to this breed

DNA tests available

Parents should be tested for:

  •  Gangliosidosis (GM2) (a lysosomal storage disease leading to neurological disorders and death)

Unofficial (breed club) schemes

None known

Ask the breeder to show you the certificates for the above tests/screening for both parents. If any of the above tests have not been considered necessary by the breeder (and there may be good reasons), ask her to explain why.

Other diseases

(for which there are currently no genetic or screening tests for sire or dam)
  • Patellar luxation (slipping kneecap)
  • Atlantoaxial subluxation (instability in the cervical spine causing neck pain)
  • Heart murmur (degenerative change of mitral valve)
  • Cataract
  • Entropion (inward turing eyelashes, causing irritation and damage to the eye)
  • Corneal ulceration related to prominent eyes
  • Dry eye
  • Persistent hyaloid artery (abnormality of blood vessel in the eye)

Ask the breeder about the medical history of the parents, grandparents and great grandparents.  Consider carefully whether to purchase a puppy if some of these or other diseases are in the family line.

Ask about the breeder’s policy in cases of serious genetic diseases occurring to your puppy in later life.  Good breeders will request to be informed of such events in order to improve future breeding decisions.  Some breeders will also agree to contribute towards medical costs or refund purchase price.

You are strongly advised to buy from a breeder who uses (or is prepared to use) the RSPCA / BVA AWF Puppy Contract and Puppy Information Pack (PIP):  www.puppycontract.org.uk

You are also advised to buy from a breeder who follows the Dog Advisory Council’s Standard for Breeders: http://www.dogbreedhealth.com/dac-breeding-standard/

List of Dog Breeds